Pinhole Photography evening session

Salford Quays Photo : Nick Prior Pinhole camera image taken from a 10x4 inch paper negative

Salford Quays
Photo : Nick Prior
Pinhole camera image taken from a 10×4 inch paper negative

The pinhole photography session last night (18th Feb) generated much enthusiastic experimentation! If you’ve got some interesting pictures as a result of last night’s work, or any you take subsequently, I’m sure we’d all be interested in seeing them.

Just upload your pictures to Google Drive – there’s a pinhole folder set up for the purpose. Remember to give your picture a title and add your name to it.

Bill was right to draw attention to one of the downsides of digital pinhole work – dust on the sensor. The pinhole provides an unprotected route for dust to take onto the camera’s sensor. its not generally a problem unless you leave the pinhole lens on your camera all the time, or use it in a particularly dusty or windblown environment. Remember to store your camera with the usual lens in place rather than the pinhole too.

I said I’d post up the slides from last night: here they are

If you just want to see the instructions for calculating the exposure, here’s the detail:

  • Set ISO to 3200 (indoors) and Av (Aperture priority) setting
  • Set aperture to f4 (or less) and take a picture
  • Note the shutter speed
  • Use calculator to match f-no and shutter speed
  • Find pinhole aperture and read off shutter speed**
  • Put pinhole on camera; set camera to Tv (Shutter priority) or M (manual)
  • Set shutter speed** and take picture
  • Adjust and try again!

And finally a couple more pictures from my early experiments with the biscuit tin and toning in PS. As ever click for a larger view:

Thelwall Viaduct Photo: Nick Prior

Thelwall Viaduct
Photo: Nick Prior

Manchester Ship Canal at Fiddlers Ferry Photo: Nick Prior

Manchester Ship Canal at Fiddlers Ferry
Photo: Nick Prior